East Meets West: Space | Kings Place

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Cello Unwrapped

Travel to Kings Place

East Meets West: Space

Korean Sounds
Music / Wednesday, 2 August 2017 - 7:30pm / Hall One
£16.50 – £12.50 | Savers £9.50*

Members from the National Gugak Center:
Jong Gil Lee gayageum – Korean zither with 12 strings
Bang Sil Lee geomungo – black crane zither
Hyun Woo Hong epiri – small double-reed oboe
Young Hun Kim daegeum – bamboo transverse flute
Hyung Sub Kim yanneum – hammered dulcimer
Soo Young Ko haegeum – fiddle-like string instrument
Jong Bum Lee danso – vertical bamboo flute
Suk Bok Hong janggu  – double-headed drum

Hyeonak Yeongsanhoesang

– Sangnyeongsan, Jungnyeongsan, Seryeongsan, Garakdeori, Sanghyeondodeuri, Hahyeondodeuri,
Yeombuldeuri, Taryeong, Gunak

Sungwon Yang cello
Enrico Pace piano

Liszt
2 Elegies, S130 & S131
Romance oubliée, S132
La lugubre gondola, S134
Die Zelle in Nonnenwerth, S382
Pensees poetiques/ Consolations Nos 1-6, S172
Ave Maria
Cantique d’Amour
Chopin Polonaise brillante in C for cello and piano, Op. 3

Explore the similarities and contrasts of Eastern and Western performances spaces – Yeongsanhoesang was often played by Korean literati in the reception room, whilst Liszts works for piano and cello take us to the European salons of the 19th century.

Originally Yeongsanhoesang was Buddhist vocal music and performed with a court dance. However, Buddhist influences of the music disappeared during the Confucian Joseon dynasty, and it became the most representative of Confucian scholars music. Formerly the music of one song (Sangyoungsan), it has now expanded to a grand piece of music consisting of nine songs in all.

Cellist Sung-Won Yang and pianist Enrico Pace then take us to the European intellectual’s world of the 19th century. Liszt was not only a composer and virtuoso pianist – he was also a conductor, teacher, arranger, organist, philanthropist and author. In his late works, he turned away from the virtuosity and his music became more contemplative, almost philosophical.

london.korean-culture.org

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Photo (top): Sungwon Yang & Enrico Pace © Tall Wall Media

*£9.50 Savers are subject to availability and automatically allocated

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Korean Sounds: East Meets West
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